Tag: programming

Scala Job Interview – FP questions

Welcome to the third installment of the Scala Job Interview Questions series. This time I’ll try to answer functional programming questions, likely my score will be a bit less than the first two editions (General Questions and Language Questions) because I like Functional Programming, but I’m still a traditional programmer (imperial?) who studied Algebra at high school and uni and then consider Algebra as useful (for programmers) as a doorstop in a tent.

Young and foolish I was, but who could imagine, back then that to run the dance of the bits I would ever need monoids?

Let’s not waste other time in void introduction, and start with the questions and my answers.

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Scala Job Interview – Language Questions

This is the second installment of this series. The first post in the series gives you a bit more context. Anyway, this is my try to answer Scala Interview grade Questions I found in a blog post by Signify. You can find alternate answers here.

Language Questions

What is the difference between a var, a val and def?

All these keywords are for declaring something. var declares a variable, val declares a variable that cannot be re-assigned and def declares a function.

scala
var a = 3
val b = 3
def c = 3

In the above code, a is a variable as you can find in almost every language, you can increment it, re-assign it. Standard stuff.

b is a variable bound to value 3 forever? Attempting to change its value results in a compile-time error. c is a parameterless function that returns 3. Interestingly a, b and c evaluate to the integer 3. Also note that val just prevents reassignment, not value change. E.g. in the following code:

scala
class Foo {
  private var a: Int = 3
  def change( newA : Int ) : Unit = { a = newA }
}

val x = new Foo()
x.change(8)

There is no compile-time error because you are not changing the bound between x and the instance that references. You are just changing the instance.

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Scala Job Interview Answers

Idling over Twitter I came across a post on Signify blog about a list of Scala Job Interview Questions. The post in fact referenced a GitHub repository. Now the post came with a pointer to ready-made answers, but I decided to take the exercise and try to reply myself. The intent was both to check my knowledge and to learn something new since I’m no Scala guru.

The post contained many questions, grouped by topic. So I prefer to split my answers along several posts to keep them short and manageable.

Let’s start with general questions.

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Is C++ Ready for Functional Programming? – Types

Types

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Although functional programming can be done in a dynamically typed language (Lisp, the functional programming language forerunner, had no types), strong static type adds a very natural complement to functional programming.

From a mathematical point of view, a function sets a relationship between the set defined by the function argument (domain in math speaking) and the corresponding results (co-domain). Algebra studies exactly these relationships and may help the programmer in proving certain properties of the functions composing the programs.

Algebraic Data Types (ADT) are aggregated types in the algebra context. Two ADTs are of particular interest – sum types and product types. With sum and product referring to the resulting number of possible values (i.e. cardinality of sets).

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Is C++ Ready for Functional Programming? – Standard Library

Time to take a closer look to the standard library from the functional programming point of view.

In the first installment of this series, I stated that using a library to implement functional programming structures would not be an ideal solution, but as C language pioneered in the 70s, part of the language finds its proper location in a library.

C++ standard library has grown disorderly oversize during the years, so let’s have a look at what kind of support is available for those that want to use C++ with the functional paradigm.

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Is C++ Ready for Functional Programming? – Functions, Functions for Everyone!

In this second installment, I’ll look closer to the core of functional programming – functions. When I started programming, BASIC was the language of choice… the only available choice. And no, it wasn’t the quite convoluted Visual Basic, but the old plain, primitive BASIC with line numbers and poor syntax.

In those days I just used GOTOs and looked with suspicion at the GOSUB/RETURN wondering why in the world I would need to automatically return when I could GOTO everywhere I needed… But I’m digressing. It is just for saying that (besides yours truly could be not the best authority on this matter), programming languages have come a long way and the poor BASIC programmer had to spin the evolution wheel for quite a while to reach to concept of function as presented in this post.

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Is C++ Ready for Functional Programming? – Intro

Design by committee (DbC) was never meant to be a compliment. In DbC, every decision has to go through a debate and be subjected to a political process. Because of the needed compromise among the parts, the resulting artifact usually tends to be clunky and patchy, lacking elegance, homogeneity, and vision.

C++ is quite an old language, not as old as its parent C, or other veterans of the computer language arena, but the first standard is now 23 years old and the language was quite well-formed and aged to mature its dose of quirks, long before that.

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Our Father’s Faults – Wrapping it up

Well, I’m running out of anti-patterns and oddly looking code from the legacy of my job-ancestors. I thinks that there are a few that are worth mentioning but don’t build up to a stand-alone post, and then its space for questions and discussions and whether exists or not a way out.

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Out Fathers’ Faults – Actors and Concurrency

When I started this job and faced the joyful world of Scala and Akka I remember I was told that thanks to the Actor model you don’t have to worry about concurrency, since every issue was handled by the acting magic.

Some months later we discovered, to our dismay that this wasn’t true. Or better, it was true most of the time if you behave properly, but there are notable exceptions.

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Our Fathers’ Faults – Actors – Explicit State

This post is not really specific to Scala/Akka, since I’ve seen Finite-State Machine (AKA FSM – not this FSM) abuse in every code base regardless of the language. I’ll try to stick with the specificities of my code base, but considerations and thoughts are quite general.

FSM is an elegant and concise formal construct that helps in designing and encoding and understanding simple computational agents.

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